June 2022

The Ankle and How It Moves

Understanding foot and ankle biomechanics can be helpful in maximizing the completion of everyday activities. Simply put, it is the way a person walks, moves, or runs. Gait is a style of walking and can involve different stages of movement. There are three components to the foot. The hindfoot is under the ankle joint. This is referred to as the back of the foot and is composed of two tarsal bones. The middle of the foot is known as the mid foot, as its name implies. This part of the foot contains five tarsal bones. Chopart’s joint is the name given where the midfoot and hindfoot connect. The front of the foot is known as the forefoot and includes the metatarsals, phalanges, and sesamoid bone. Each foot consists of 28 bones, and several ligaments, tendons, and muscles. They work together in absorbing shock and creating movement from the heels to the toes. The muscles in the back and front of the leg allow the foot to move up and down and there are specific muscles that enable the foot to point and flex. If you would like to learn additional information about what proper foot structure is responsible for, please consult with a podiatrist. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Kaveh Panahi, DPM from Acacia Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Peoria, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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A Closer Look at Plantar Fasciitis

Plantar fasciitis occurs when the connective plantar fascia tissue on the bottom of the foot becomes inflamed, or even torn, from overuse. Women, runners, people who are obese or who stand while working, are more at risk of developing plantar fasciitis. Also, having certain structural issues—such as flat feet, high arches, or tight calf muscles—can cause the plantar fascia to pull away from the heel while it is bearing weight, and may lead to this condition. Plantar fasciitis can be very painful, especially when you take your first steps in the morning, thereby engaging the plantar fascia after a long period of inactivity. Icing, stretching, anti-inflammatory medications and injections, casting, splinting, and other conservative treatments administered by a podiatrist can usually repair the plantar fascia without the need for surgery. It is suggested to make an appointment with a podiatrist to have your condition diagnosed and treated properly. 

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Kaveh Panahi, DPM from Acacia Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affect people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Peoria, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Are You Suffering From Ingrown Toenails?

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Signs of Poor Circulation

The circulatory system in the body is rarely thought about when it is working properly. Problems may occur when blood flow is restricted, and can cause reduced mobility, in addition to increasing the risk of a heart attack. A common cause of poor circulation is peripheral artery disease (PAD). One of the first signs of this condition can be pain in the feet and legs while walking, and this may be diminished by stretching and exercising at least three times per week. It is suggested to patients who smoke to stop or cut back, and people who are diabetic to control their sugar intake. A sign of poor circulation can include a wound on the foot that doesn't heal. Many people are unaware they may have cuts and scrapes on their feet as a result of the inability to feel sensations. Patients who are short of breath may be experiencing poor circulation, and this may be a subtle sign of a heart issue. If you have any of these symptoms, it is strongly suggested that you are under the care of a podiatrist who can offer you correct treatment options.

While poor circulation itself isn’t a condition; it is a symptom of another underlying health condition you may have. If you have any concerns with poor circulation in your feet contact Kaveh Panahi, DPM of Acacia Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Poor Circulation in the Feet

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) can potentially lead to poor circulation in the lower extremities. PAD is a condition that causes the blood vessels and arteries to narrow. In a linked condition called atherosclerosis, the arteries stiffen up due to a buildup of plaque in the arteries and blood vessels. These two conditions can cause a decrease in the amount of blood that flows to your extremities, therefore resulting in pain.

Symptoms

Some of the most common symptoms of poor circulation are:

  • Numbness
  • Tingling
  • Throbbing or stinging pain in limbs
  • Pain
  • Muscle Cramps

Treatment for poor circulation often depends on the underlying condition that causes it. Methods for treatment may include insulin for diabetes, special exercise programs, surgery for varicose veins, or compression socks for swollen legs.

As always, see a podiatrist as he or she will assist in finding a regimen that suits you. A podiatrist can also prescribe you any needed medication. 

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Peoria, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Ankle Sprains Are a Common Ankle Injury

The ankle is a complex joint composed of several bones, ligaments, tendons, nerves, and muscles. Because it is critical in moving the foot in a variety of ways, the ankle is prone to becoming injured. One of the most common types of ankle injuries is an ankle sprain. This occurs when one or more ligaments that support and bind the ankle are stretched beyond their normal bounds and become injured or torn (either partially or fully). The pain and complexities of an ankle sprain can vary, depending upon how severe it has become injured and whether the ligament has torn. It is important to seek treatment from a podiatrist for any type of ankle sprain, as an improperly healed ankle sprain is likely to lead to additional sprains and possibly even chronic ankle instability. 

Ankle sprains are common but need immediate attention. If you need your feet checked, contact Kaveh Panahi, DPM from Acacia Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains take place when the ligaments in your ankle are torn or stretched beyond their limits. There are multiple ways that the ankle can become injured, including twisting or rolling over onto your ankle, putting undue stress on it, or causing trauma to the ankle itself.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Mild to moderate bruising
  • Limited mobility
  • Swelling
  • Discoloration of the skin (depending on severity)

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

Treatment of a sprain depends on the severity.  Many times, people are told to rest and remain off their feet completely, while others are given an air cast. If the sprain is very severe, surgery may be required.

If you have suffered an ankle sprain previously, you may want to consider additional support such as a brace and regular exercises to strengthen the ankle.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Peoria, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

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